The HoffmanLaw Office of Lake County, Illinois defends drivers who have been charged with leaving the scene of an accident in the Lake County traffic courts.

Courthouses where we defend drivers like you against leaving the scene of an accident traffic violations include those located in Mundelein, Round Lake Beach, Park City and Waukegan.

How serious is a leaving the scene of an accident charge?

Leaving the scene of an accident is a criminal offense. It is often punished as a class A misdemeanor, with a potential fine of up to $2,500 and by up to 364 days in jail. In some cases, leaving the scene of an accident is punishable as a felony, with potentially even more severe penalties.

Additionally, there are some situations where the charge of leaving the scene of an accident can lead to the suspension or revocation of your driver’s license or your Illinois driving privileges.

We're ready to defend your case.

The HoffmanLaw Office has almost twenty years of experience with Lake County leaving the scene of an accident charges. We understand the issues involved in your case and are ready to get to work in defending you.

As your attorney in Lake County traffic court, it will be our goal to effectively defend you against the allegations, to minimize their impact on your driving privileges, and to keep you on the road.




In Illinois, there are a number of different ways you can be charged with the offense of leaving the scene of an accident.

Probably the most common type of leaving the scene of an accident traffic ticket alleges you left the scene of an accident that resulted in damage to another vehicle.

Another, often more serious type of leaving the scene of an accident ticket can allege you left the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death.

Whatever type of leaving the scene of an accident traffic ticket you are facing in Lake County, Illinois traffic court, the HoffmanLaw Office has the experience necessary to effectively defend your case.

In Illinois, if you, as the driver of a vehicle, are involved in a motor vehicle accident that led only to damage to a vehicle that is driven or “attended” by any person, you are required to stop your vehicle at the scene of the accident and to provide certain information. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-402(a).

What type of information must you provide?

The information you must provide includes your name, address, the registration number and owner of the vehicle you were driving and, if requested, a showing of your driver’s license. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-403.

What if you can't stop at the scene of the accident?

If you are unable to stop at the scene of the accident, you are required to stop as close to the accident as possible and to return to the scene of the accident and stay there until you have furnished the requisite information.

If, for safety reasons, you can neither stay at nor return to the scene of the accident, you are permitted to move your vehicle to the nearest safe location that does not obstruct traffic. But you may not leave that place until you have provided the requisite information described above.

What are the penalties for leaving the scene of a property damage accident?

The offense of leaving the scene of a property damage accident as described above is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $2,500 and by up to 364 days in jail. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-402(a).

Additionally, if you are convicted of this offense and the damage to a vehicle was in excess of $1,000, the court is required to notify the Office of the Illinois Secretary of State [“Secretary of State”] of both the conviction and the extent of the damage.

On receipt of that information, the Secretary of State is required to suspend your Illinois driver’s license or Illinois driving privileges. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-402(b).

Another type of property-damage leaving the scene of an accident case involves damage to an unattended vehicle or property. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-404.

If, as a driver, you are involved in a motor vehicle accident with an unattended vehicle or other property that resulted in damage to that vehicle or property, you also have certain obligations.

In such a case, Illinois law requires that you stop immediately at the scene of the accident. You are then and there required to either:

  • locate and notify the operator or owner of the vehicle or owner of the property of your name, address, registration number and the owner of the vehicle you were driving, or

  • attach securely in a conspicuous place on or in the vehicle or other property struck a written notice containing that same information.

Whether you locate and notify someone or leave written notice, in either case you are required, “without unnecessary delay,” to notify the nearest police authority of your involvement in the accident.

If allegedly you fail to comply with these requirements, you can be charged with the offense of leaving the scene of an accident involving damage to an unattended vehicle or property.

This offense also is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $2,500 and by up to 364 days in jail.

If you are involved in a motor vehicle accident resulting in personal injury to or death of any person, you are required to stop your vehicle at the scene of the accident.

If you are unable to stop at the scene, you must stop as close to the scene as possible and return to the scene. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-401(a).

At the scene of the accident, you are required to provide your name, address, and the registration number and the identity of the owner of the vehicle you were driving and, on request, to show your driver’s license. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-403.

What are your requirements if someone was injured?

If someone was injured in the accident, you are required also to render that person reasonable assistance.

This assistance includes carrying or making arrangements for carrying that person to medical treatment if it is apparent such treatment is necessary, or if the person requests it. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-403.

What is required if you do not stop at the scene?

If you do not stop at the scene of a personal injury or death accident, you are required to report the place of the accident, the date, the approximate time, your name and address, the registration number of the vehicle you were driving, and the names of all other occupants of your vehicle to a police station near where the accident occurred. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-401(b).

You are required to make this report as soon as possible and in all cases no later than one-half hour after the accident occurred.

If you were hospitalized and incapacitated during that time period, you are required to make such report as soon as possible and in all cases no later than one-half hour after you are discharged from the hospital.

What are the penalties for leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death?

The penalties for leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death increase in severity depending on the circumstances of the case.

Leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death is a class 4 felony offense in the event you did not remain at or return to the scene of the accident and provide information as required. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-401(c).

If you left the scene of such an accident and failed to report the accident within a half hour of its occurrence or within a half hour of your discharge from a hospital, the penalties become more severe.

In this situation, if someone was injured in the accident but no one died, the offense is a class 2 felony. A class 2 felony is punishable by up to a $25,000 fine and by up to between 3 to 7 years in prison. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-401(d).

If you left the scene of such an accident resulting in death and failed to report the accident within a half hour of its occurrence or within a half hour of your discharge from a hospital, the offense is a class 1 felony. A class 1 felony is punishable by up to a $25,000 fine and by up to between 4 to 15 years in prison. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-401(d).

What will happen to your driver's license if you are convicted of leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death?

If you are convicted of the offense of leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death, the Office of the Illinois Secretary of State will revoke your driving privileges. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-401(e).

You can see that there is repeated reference, in the leaving the scene of an accident scenarios, to your obligation to remain at the scene of an accident and provide certain information.

This duty to provide information can arise in cases involving damage to an attended vehicle (see section 11-402), as well as in cases involving personal injury or death (see section 11-401).

In a case involving personal injury, you could also be required to render aid.

Can you be punished for simply failing to provide information?

Section 11-403 of the Illinois vehicle code separately punishes the failure to give information after involvement in an accident leading to damage to an attended vehicle or personal injury or death.

Whereas sections 11-402 and 11-401 punish leaving the scene of these types of accidents, Section 11-403 specifically and separately punishes the alleged failure to give the information required to be given or to render appropriate aid. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-403.

The information that Section 11-403 requires you to provide has been stated previously on this page. It includes your name, address, registration number and the identity of the owner of the vehicle you were driving, as well as the display of your driver’s license if requested.

Can you be punished for failing to render aid?

Just as you can be punished for failing to provide information, in accident cases resulting in personal injury, you can be charged with and punished for failing to render aid.

What is the penalty for failing to give information or render aid?

The offense of failing to give information or render aid is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to a $2,500 fine and by up to 364 days in jail.

If, as the driver of a vehicle, you are involved in an accident resulting in damage to property of any one person, including yourself, in excess of $1,500 (or in excess of $500 if any vehicle involved in the accident was not covered by insurance), or resulting in injury or death, you are required to notify the nearest police authority by the fastest available means of communication if no police officer is present. See, 625 ILCS 5/11-407(a).

Failure to notify the police of your involvement in an accident as required is a petty offense.



Failing to Remain at or Return to

The Scene of a Motor Vehicle Accident

And to Provide Required Aid or Information


attorney analysis of lake county leaving scene accident tickets

Analysis.

The HoffmanLaw Office always is focused on the presumption of innocence. Building on this presumption, the HoffmanLaw Office performs a systematic and searching ANALYSIS of the facts alleged in your Lake County leaving the scene of an accident case. This intensive analysis exposes weakness in the prosecution's evidence and develops powerful defense arguments and strategies.

attorney preparation of lake county traffic tickets for leaving the scene of an accident

Preparation.

The HoffmanLaw Office strives to know completely the facts and law of your Lake County traffic case. In traffic court, good results do not often emerge by chance. They come through intense PREPARATION that lays the groundwork for success. When you select the HoffmanLaw Office as your legal advocate, you team yourself with a philosophy of extreme preparation.

attorney producing effective results lake county traffic court leaving the scene cases

Results.

The HoffmanLaw Office views every time it appears in court with you as an opportunity to achieve RESULTS. Whether it is negotiating during a pretrial conference, cross-examining a witness, or delivering a closing argument at trial, the HoffmanLaw Office strives to be your best advocate at all times.

Facing Lake County Illinois Leaving the Scene of an Accident Charges?




If a HoffmanLaw attorney defends your Lake County leaving the scene of an accident case, we will look at a number of different issues.

What type of issues will we examine?

We will want to know where the alleged accident happened. Did it happen out on a street, in a parking lot, or somewhere else?

How many vehicles in total were involved? Were you involved in a single vehicle accident, concerning your vehicle only? Or were you involved in a multiple vehicle crash that included one or more other drivers or vehicles?

If you were involved in a property damage accident, what was the extent of the damage to vehicles you were not driving? What was the extent of the damage to your own vehicle?

Did you stop at the scene of the accident after it occurred? Did you attempt to provide or exchange information with any other drivers or property owners involved?

Did you make a report of the accident to the police?

Did the traffic or roadway conditions make it impossible for you to have stopped at the accident scene?

Did the other driver or drivers remain at the scene of the accident, or did they leave? Did they make any effort to provide you with their own identifying information?

All of these questions are relevant to a full analysis of the issues in your Lake County leaving the scene of an accident case.

As your attorney and legal advocate, the HoffmanLaw Office will look at these and other issues. It will be our goal to examine your version of the facts and to highlight any inconsistencies and weaknesses in the prosecution’s case.

We have a strong track record of successfully resolving Lake County leaving the scene of an accident traffic violations and reaching excellent outcomes for our clients. We are ready to put our experience to work in defending your case.


Defending Serious Leaving the Scene of an Accident Charges in Lake County Illinois Traffic Court

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Can you receive court supervision in this type of case?

If you are charged with a misdemeanor version of leaving the scene of an accident, you may be eligible for a disposition of court supervision in your case. Court supervision is known as a “deferred judgment” of conviction. This means that if you are placed on a period of court supervision, no conviction for the offense of leaving the scene of an accident will be recorded on your driving record if you successfully fulfill the requirements of your supervision. By no means are you required to seek a supervision disposition in your case. You are presumed innocent of the charge against you and you have the right to contest the allegation and to pursue a dismissal of the charge at trial if you wish.

Can your license be suspended or revoked for this offense?

The Office of the Illinois Secretary of State is required to revoke your Illinois driver’s license, if you have one, or your Illinois driving privileges, if you do not, if you are convicted of leaving the scene of an accident involving personal injury or death. See, 625 ILCS 5/6-205(a)(4). If you are convicted of leaving the scene of an accident resulting in damage to a vehicle in excess of $1,000, the Secretary of State is authorized to suspend your Illinois driver’s license or driving privileges for one full year. See, 625 ILCS 5/6-206(a)(21).

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